Fighting cancer: scientists started talking about “the universal way”

Борьба с раком: ученые заговорили об "универсальном способе"

The team of scientists managed to find a way to get a view of T lymphocytes attack a wide range of cancer cells.

Opening team of scientists from Cardiff University may allow physicians “to set” the human immune system against cancer cells. This may open the way to the “universal” cure for cancer.

The method has not yet been clinically tested, but the researchers say that it’s got huge potential. A summary of the work was published in the journal Nature Immunology, reports BBC.

The essence of the research was to search for “unusual” ways in which the immune system fights off cancerous tumors.

Scientists have discovered a special type of T-lymphocyte cells, which in humans is responsible for the immune response.

However, the scientists found the cell, unlike others, can counteract various types of threats.

“There’s a chance that it could cure all patients. Previously, nobody thought that was possible,” said researcher Henry Sewell. How it works

On the surface of T lymphocytes (or T cells), there are chemical receptors by which they determine the antigens that are dangerous for the body.

The team of scientists managed to find a way to get a view of T lymphocytes attack a wide range of cancer cells.

The method would be tested on cells lung cancer, blood cancer, colon, breast, bone, prostate, ovaries and cervix.

Lymphocytes destroy cancer cells without touching healthy.

How is the T-lymphocyte differentiates cancer cells from healthy, is not yet clear. Its receptor interacts with a molecule called MR1, which is on the surface of every cell in the human body.

It is believed that cancer cells “use” MR1 masking from the immune system. However, discovered in Cardiff T-lymphocytes, the researchers believe, can get from MR1 the signal that the cell metabolism is disturbed, and that is a cell of the tumor.

“We are the first to describe T-cell detection in cancer cells MR1. It couldn’t be done,” says researcher Harry Dalton.

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